All posts by Eliot Moleba

I am a scholar and a storyteller. I am very passionate about storytelling and I believe we, as people, are made up of no more than a collection of stories. They shape and influence who I was, I am and will be. It is through our stories that we remind ourselves and each other what it means to share, experience and embrace our common humanity. Follow me on my blog/website: eliotmoleba.com Let's make a new story!

Urgent Call to African Artists

Urgent to ALL!

Please tell us, as African artists (and especially French-speaking artists) why do you make work for young audiences and what is most important in your work? Please offer us a short paragraph-lengt h answers. These are for a composite article in the ASSITEJ international magazine for 2013 which will be available in Linz. It will be in French and English so you can send responses in either language. Include some high quality photos of your production(s).

Email your response to Marisa Gimenez Cacho at marisagcacho@yahoo.com.mx

Please share this with as many friends and families of artists who do a lot of work with children. Thank you!

Contact Details

Dear all,

Please note that I have finally set up new email accounts (under my domain).

So from now on whenever you need to contact me, please use the details below:

For potential collaborations and general enquiries:

Email: info(at)eliotmoleba(dot)com

I look forward to interacting with you all!

Pictures: The Man In The Green Jacket (Stage reading)

These photos were taken by David Ceruti.

The reading was staged at the Wits Nunnery on the 4th of March 2013.

 

FATEJ: Biennial festival 2013

Eliot Moleba

This is a picture of Donald Mvolo and myself on my visit to Cameroon’s FATEJ, which is a Biennial theatre festival for children and young people. Mr. Mvolo is a local theatre director and writer. I had such a great time watching performances mostly in French. I never really knew what most of them were about, but it was great just to enjoy the theatrical and physical dynamics of the shows. I was particularly impressed with Donald’s show which managed to transcend linguistic barriers that plunged the atmosphere – I understood his show. Of course, this was helped by two very talented actors. They were very expressive and retained a clarity of gestures.

It was a marvel to watch them!

 

Pictures: Sizwe Banzi is Alive

My New Play

This is the man who my current play is, in part, based on. When the Marikana Massacre happened, he has the only face identified as a leader. He died among the men he led. Such a brave man, yet we know so little about him.
This is the man who my current play is, in part, based on. When the Marikana Massacre happened, he was the first face to be identified as a leader. He died among the men he led. Such a brave man, yet we know so little about him.

Who is he?

Where is he from?

Who is the man behind his face?

These are some of the questions that sparked the creation of “The Man In The Green Jacket”

A play which deals with the latest labour unrest that hit South Africa last year.

Apartheid in South Africa

In this play, my attempt was not so much to directly speak to the politics of the labour unrest, but to understand the personal politics of the face behind the man who put his life on the line to fight for what he believed in. What personally motivated this for him? I wanted to reveal the effects of the politic narrative through his life. Such bravery is something that has not been seen in South Africa since the days of apartheid. Now we are fighting a different apartheid, and I call it an economic apartheid. Beyond our colour-line politics, not much has changed in our country for ordinary black South Africans. And the labour unrest hightlighted this plight of the poor, which is why the government gunned them down. Their strike was perhaps the first act of solidarity among the working class since the strike of the 1973 where workers united in spirit and numbers to shake the moral core of our racist regime. This spirit is dead, or was, until the Marikana miners decided to end their silence and speak out against their common plight at the hands of our repressive economic apartheid.

Apartheid in South AfricaSouth Africa is perhaps yet to realize a truly meaningful political and economic transition. The miners demonstrated that just like the apartheid could not suppress the freedom of blacks forever, so is the plight of the average working class. We are heading for a revolution! It is brewing under the belly of this country and we are starting to see fumes and steams of it blow up. The façade of freedom and economic development of South Africans the government has promised is wearing off – it will be ironic that a real full revolution in this country will be against a black government. The very people who fought apartheid are now sitting at the helm of economic apartheid just so that they can enrich themselves. But no man escapes his judgment, our days are numbered.

Watch this space!

The people will rise again.

Their voice’s echo will break the shackles of economic apartheid.

Amandla!

Awethu!

(Power, to the people)