Category Archives: Reviews

One Night In Snake Park

Grappling with South Africa’s xenophobic demons through the death of 14-year-old Siphiwe Mahori

Trailer of One Night in Snake Park
NEW PODCAST INVESTIGATES VIOLENCE, XENOPHOBIA, AND CORRUPTION IN SOUTH AFRICA’S TOWNSHIPS IN ONE NIGHT IN SNAKE PARK

Sound Africa has launched a new six-part narrative podcast, One Night in Snake Park, exploring violence, immigration, and the politics of South Africa’s townships.

In 2015, 14-year-old Siphiwe Mahori was killed in Snake Park, Soweto by a foreign shopkeeper. His death made international headlines and sparked renewed xenophobic violence across the country’s black townships. But by the end of that year, his name was all but forgotten.

In recent weeks, South Africa’s xenophobic violence and its accompanying rhetoric on and offline reached fever pitch. From the Sunday Independent’s controversial headline “South Africa Under Foreign Control” and the #PutSouthAfricaFirst social media campaigns calling for South Africa to close its borders and remove foreigners from the country.

Yet, this rhetoric is not new. Nor are the attacks. But focusing on immigrants alone ignores what is really at stake. This is a story about South African townships: about hope and aspiration; about promises broken; about people frightened of those meant to guide and protect them.  This is a story about South Africa’s transformation. About its future.

Building on I Want to Go Home Forevera collection of oral histories of violence in South African townships, researcher Eliot Moleba and journalists Rasmus Bitsch and Tanya Pampalone, return to Snake Park to find what really happened the day Siphiwe Mahori died. Each 30-minute episode explores aspects of his life and the world in which he lived: urbanisation, xenophobia, the justice system, and the value of black lives in contemporary South Africa.

Filled with voices and sounds from across the township, this cutting-edge investigation speaks to a cast of rarely explored characters and processes. Guaranteed to unsettle your presumptions about violence, the township economies, trade, immigration, and inequality, it is a must-listen for anyone invested in South Africa’s future.

One Night in Snake Park is supported by the Taco Kuiper Investigative Journalism grant. This collaboration is brought to you by Sound Africa; a non-profit podcasting organization based in South Africa.

For more information and interviews

Contact: Jedi Ramalapa
Email: info@soundafrica.org

Email: Tanya Pampalone
tanyapampalone@gmail.com

HOW TO LISTEN:

If you want to listen directly on your computer, just go to the Sound Africa front page and click on the episode you want to hear. You can do the same on your phone or tablet, but if you want to subscribe or download you will need a podcast app.

It’s really simple and can make your commute or gym time 10 times better.

For iPhone or iPad:

On your device there is an app called Podcasts. Open that app and search for Sound Africa. Click subscribe and you will automatically see all our episodes. In the app you can stream directly or download to listen on the go!

For Android:

For Android phones and tablets you will need a podcast app. You can get one from the Google Play store. Anyone will do, for example Podcast Addict or Stitcher. When you have downloaded your app, you can search for Sound Africa and click subscribe. In the app you can stream directly or download to listen on the go!

Same procedure for any other podcast!

Connect on your favourite platform

If you can’t find Sound Africa in your app or want to listen on another platform, you can copy and paste this RSS-feed into your podcast player:

PC: Right click and copy link address

Mobile: press and hold here then copy URL

Or simply click on any of the platforms below:STITCHER | APPLE PODCAST | SOUND CLOUD | TUNE IN | SPOTIFY

Sizwe Banzi lives in a new play

JOHN Kani’s, Athol Fugard’s and Winston Ntshona’s Sizwe Banzi Is Dead is one of SA’S classic and important plays dealing with the everyday plights of the black man during apartheid.

JHB

In it Sizwe Banzi, who is jobless with an expired work permit, faces the prospect of going home to the disappointed faces of his family who expect him to be who he’s always been: the breadwinner. In a twist of events he takes on the identity of a murdered stranger who happens to have the work permit he so needs, thus considering his own identity, as Sizwe Banzi, dead.

The effects of this timeless piece have resulted in three youngsters creating a new play in response to the original. Sizwe Banzi Is Alive, directed by Eliot Moleba, with actors Simpho Mthenjwa and Msiza Mbali, who are Wits graduates, speaks to how the issues in Sizwe Banzi Is Dead have affected today’s generation.

“For every action there is a consequence. For every missing person there is a family living with the mystery of their disappearance,” goes the tag line for the new play.

Moleba believes this is a story forming one case of the many unsolved mysteries of SA’S wounded people and past. And this is a personal story. Msiza and Mthenjwa will present a number of characters who will take the audience through a heartfelt story of a young man in search of his grandfather, his name and his past.

“The new play marks the risks and bravery invested and celebrated about the original Sizwe Banzi as one of the timeless stories of our heritage. And it is in the relentless pursuit of one’s identity that this work draws an inspiration to tell a new story about my identity within the contemporary South African socio-political landscape. So this is an entirely new search of separate voice and self in a different time frame within the South African context. My re-imagination of the narrative weaves in the issues that reflect most of the truth and challenges of our current time,” says Moleba.

The story follows a grandson’s search for a distant past. Wiseman goes to New Brighton where his grandfather was last seen. What this unravels is dramatic tension and conflict that comes with meeting the right name, but the wrong face.

Talking about the creative process, Moleba says he and his cast realised that as the new generation, they were Wiseman and they were dealing with their personal narratives – which, more than feeding into the process, were the process.

“I believe it is through our stories that we remind ourselves and each other what it means to share our life experience and embrace our common humanity. Thus, as a contemporary young theatre-director in search of a ‘new voice’, I love and want to create a theatrical space that engages with social issues that are thoughtprovoking, reflective, relevant and pressing to my audience(s).

“As such, Sizwe Banzi Is Alive is an artistic offering that engages with a tone that begins to creatively shape a personal and collective voice. How am I, born into a new democratic South African society, supposed to make sense of where I come from when my personal and family history is a mystery to me?” Moleba asks.

For him and his cast the play is a confrontation of the generation gap. It’s a dialogue about the old and new generations’ relationship(s) with the past, and audiences are welcome to bring their stories too.

These youngsters’ objective is to open up a conversation among SA artists, friends, parents, grandparents and most importantly the youth. They plan to take the production to high schools and community halls and spread it far and wide.

is on at Space.com at the Joburg Theatre from June 6-10 before moving to Cape Town in July.

The article first appeared here.

Contact Details

Dear all,

Please note that I have finally set up new email accounts (under my domain).

So from now on whenever you need to contact me, please use the details below:

For potential collaborations and general enquiries:

Email: info(at)eliotmoleba(dot)com

I look forward to interacting with you all!

Review: Sizwe Banzi is Alive

Sizwe
Masiza Mbali (left) and Simpho Mathenjwa (right) In Sizwe Banzi is Alive

 

This past week, Joburg was thrilled by an innovative performance of Sizwe Banzi is Alive.  The theatrical work, directed by Eliot Moleba boasts a cast of two immensely talented actors: Masiza Mbali and Simpho Mathenjwa. Through a startling lack of props and a bare stage, the cast effectively captures its audience as they bring to life the beautiful and equally heartbreaking tale of so many families of this country.

 South Africa is a diverse nation struggling everyday to heal the wounds of the past. It’s powerful and promising present has been starkly cut out from a painful past but how is the present defined? It’s defined by those living in it and most importantly, by their identity. Sizwe Banzi is Alive explores this concept as well as the problems and emotions arising from the struggle to find that identity. The journey undertaken in this play is not the journey of one man but rather it highlights the personal struggles of many South Africans today.

 

Sizwe 2
Masiza Mbali and Simpho Mathenjwa



Watching this show is not a one hour experience. The story lingers with the viewer long after the show has closed. The play maintains a brilliant balance of drama, suspense and a touch of humour; truly an eye-opening experience and a pleasure to watch!

 

This review was written by Erin-Dianne Richards on the 12th of July 2012.

 

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